Study: Digital Technology Becomes More Common at the Workplace

a man pressing on virtual images about the workplace and work process

It seems that all employees in the U.S. should learn more digital skills to remain competitive in the employment market.

Since 2002, digital tools have become common for 517 out of 545 jobs, mainly in lower-skilled positions, states a Brookings Institution study. It reflected the emergence of modern technology as an inevitable part of almost any job.

High-Tech Work

The study noted that the 545 types of occupations represent 90% of the U.S. job market. Higher salaries come with jobs with more digital content, which could be one reason to improve your knowledge of modern technology.

For instance, a career in law enforcement will require you to be adept at digital skills if you plan to be a criminal investigator. Certification from institutions such as The Center For Legal Studies also helps your chances of landing a job in this field.

Job seekers are more likely to find these high-paying jobs in Austin, Texas and Silicon Valley, Seattle, which are traditional technology hubs. Brookings Institution used data from the Labor Department for the study. It provides each occupation with a score of 0 to 100 based on the necessity to use digital tools.

The average mean or score for the study’s sample size reached 46 in 2016, up 59% from 29 in 2002.

Job Growth

The study noted that some employers find it difficult to fill vacancies due to a lack of skilled workers, which could be one reason for the less-than-expected growth of jobs in October.

The Labor Department said that there were 261,000 new jobs during the month. It helped the jobless rate to reach at 4.1%, which was the lowest point since 2000.

Whether or not your job remains unaffected by the increased use of digital tools, it may be better to start familiarizing yourself with different technologies to stay competitive in case you look for a new job.

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